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Fraud Prevention Tips

 

Take the following steps to help fight fraud:

  

  1. Review activity on all of your bank and credit card accounts regularly and report suspicious activity promptly.

   

  1. Create a strong, unique password for each online sign-in – and use additional security features when available.

  

  1. Protect your devices by installing antivirus software and keeping your operating systems, applications and web browser up-to-date on your mobile phone, tablet and computer.

 

Stay alert to online threats. Avoid clicking suspicious links or responding to emails or texts urging you to act quickly. Do not provide personal information like your account numbers, PIN or Social Security number.

 

Never trust caller ID: Always validate a person’s organization by calling them back through an official phone number.

    • Scammers may pose as government officials, law enforcement or even Bank of America employees to steal your personal information.
    • Zelle® and other payment apps, such as Venmo, should only be used to send money to friends, family or others you trust and not to buy goods or services from people you don’t know.

 

Know how to identify red flags. In many of the most common types of scams, you may be:

      • Pressured to send money
      • Threatened with law enforcement action
      • Told to purchase gift cards and provide codes as a form of payment
      • Asked to cash a check for a stranger
      • Instructed to make a cash deposit for sweepstakes
      • Offered more than you are asking for something with a request to send the overpayment elsewhere

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Project Report from MHSOAC

 TOGETHER WE CAN: Reducing Criminal Justice Involvement for People with Mental Illness

California’s Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission (MHSOAC) launched an eighteen month review of this issue and has just released the report, Together We Can: Reducing Criminal Justice Involvement for People with Mental Illness.

 

While not a comprehensive study of mental illness, it’s an actionable roadmap for change calling for California to make an immediate and strong commitment to address this complex issue. “One of the greatest policy failures of our time was dismantling our state mental health care institutions without having adequate community-based treatment in its place,” said MHSOAC Commissioner and Santa Barbara County Sheriff Bill Brown. “Our jails shouldn’t be used in place of treatment. We believe we should, and can, do better.”

News Release

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